President’s Oak Lives on at UW-Madison

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MADISON (WKOW) — UW-Madison’s oldest tree, cut down three years ago, is getting another lease on life.

In 2015, UW-Madison had to say goodbye to the President’s Oak. It was the oldest tree on campus, estimated to be around 300 years old.

While effort was taken to save the tree, drought, harsh winters and the inevitable aging process took their toll.

But now, the tree will live on thanks to the planting of a graft from the original tree.

During Wednesday’s planting ceremony, Chancellor Rebecca Blank called the tree an important part of the University’s history.

“I would love to think of it as a symbol of both the past history of this University and all the people who passed under it, but also as a symbol of the future and the connection between our past and our future as we plant both an old tree and a new tree at the same time,” Blank said.

The President’s Oak got its name from a nearby building that originally housed several university presidents, which is now occupied by the La Follette School of Public Affairs.

Emily Friese

Emily Friese

27 News Producer

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